Plunk Y DNA Haplogroup

I first had my cousins tested through ancestry.com for 35 markers and there were very few results, but that’s a story for another day.

According to ancestry, the Plunk Y DNA Haplogroup is R1b and the ancient history is The Artisans who, according to ancestry.com, arrived in Europe from Asia about 35,000 to 40,000 years ago. I admit that isn’t much use in finding an ancestor from 150 years ago, but it is interesting. Plus, it’s more than I knew about my great grandfather prior to testing his male descendants.

You can google The Artisans and find out more, but it’s basically pretty much what it sounds like. Think of the art found on cave dwellings.

I then transferred the Y DNA of one of these male descendants to Family Tree DNA (FTDNA), upgraded to two more markers, and their prediction of the Plunk Y DNA Haplogroup is R1b1a2 and for the ancestral origins, Family Tree DNA gave this information:

12 Marker
Exact Match
Country Match Total Country Total Percentage Comments
Germany 1 12073 < 0.1 %

Genetic Distance -1
Country Match Total Country Total Percentage Comments
Germany 2 12073 < 0.1 %
Kazakhstan 1 156 0.6%
Switzerland 1 1844 0.1% Zurich (1)

25 Marker
Genetic Distance -2
Country Match Total Country Total Percentage Comments
Germany 1 7082 < 0.1 %

The way I understand it is that the above is information as to the Plunk male nationality based on the people outside of the United States that tested. The columns may be a little off, but look at the 12 marker, exact match. The country is Germany, We matched 1 out of 12,073 testers for a percentage of less than 0.1%. When you look at the table as a whole, wouldn’t you say that David Brazille Plunk was of German descent, thus proving a family history of his parental origins?

FTDNA also said my Plunk ancestor belongs to the Haplogroup R- M269, that his ancestors likely began in West Asia, that it (the haplogroup), “is the descendant of the major R-M343 lineage. Some of your genetic cousins traveled northwest into Central Asia and on to Europe”.

Now I know where his line started 40,000 years ago. Next step, finding where it started 150 years ago.

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